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Seller's Description

As you step aboard Gaia, things just seem different. It might be the warmth of her teak, her palatial cockpit, or the jauntiness of her bowsprit as you look forward to survey her lines. She is perfectly set up as a comfortable, spacious crusing yacht - ready to go with amenities for your long weekend or offshore adventure. Take a wander forward onto her bowsprit, turn around and look back. You will realize this is one of the best seats in the house just to take it all in when you are underway, especially if you have been joined by a dolphin or two on your journey. Gaia is a well loved and cared for Whitby - Brewer 42. She is a 42 foot Center Cockpit Staysail Ketch, built in Canada in 1987 and one of the last two Whitby - Brewer’s built in Whitby Ontario. With a moderate draft, she is the perfect boat whether you crave deep-water offshore passages, island hopping in the Bahamas, cruising the intracoastal or enjoying cocktails with friends at the marina. In fact, with Gaia’s ample space, storage and appointments she would make an ideal floating home. Gaia has had many high-quality upgrades over the last few years, much of it in the last year. She has been meticulously maintained from her masthead to her through-hulls. Many of her core systems are new, all installation and refit work has been completed with the highest level of professionalism. Gaia is turn-key ready for the sailor just itching to drop the lines.

This wonderful yacht has two beautiful cabins, both with ensuite heads. Her large salon sports new upholstery, stainless steel opening ports throughout and several hatches for an abundance of light and ventilation. Gaia has a large hard-top that protects the cockpit and provides shade; or with easy access via her two ladder-type aft stanchions becomes the ultimate sun pad. Her LED lighted cockpit is perfect for evening gatherings on the hook or at the dock. With her shoal draft hull design, split rig, manageable sail system and large fuel and water capacity; plus, vast amounts of space and storage, Gaia is possibly the perfect sailing/crusing yacht.

Equipment: Engine Room The engine room is accessed via the salon/master passage and has a significant volume of space. This area houses the main engine, dual Racor fuel filters, fwd. house battery, start battery, inverter/converter, refrigeration compressor, port fuel tank, autopilot pump, auxiliary bilge pump and more. There is generous space for future upgrades of equipment including space for a small generator.

Volvo Penta MD30A 65 diesel (2) Xantrex digital echo chargers Fwd. house battery Start battery Guest house battery switch Transmission with reduction gears Hydraulic pump for autopilot Bilge ventilation system Racor dual fuel filtration system XAR Digital Alternator Regulator 1 1/4” Monel drive shaft Freedom inverter/converter DC electrical junction panel Hynautics hydraulic steering reservoir Refrigeration control box

Sails & Rigging Mainsail Mizzen Genoa Staysail Asymmetrical Spinnaker with sock Spinnaker pole (carbon fiber) SeaFurl 5 roller-furlers (Jib and Staysail) 2 cockpit life harness anchor points Spars - Isomat

(2) Genoa sheet winches (2-speed) (2) Main Halyard winches (Lewmar 8) (1) Main Aux winch (Lewmar 8) (1) Mizzen Halyard winch 9 (Lewmar 8) (2) Aux sheet winch (Lewmar 30 self-tail) (2) Main sheet winch (Lewmar 52 self-tail) Stack-packs (Main and Mizzen) Adjustable boom vang Electronics Raymarine Navigation Suite (connected with SeaTalk) Chart Plotter Radar Autopilot Depth Speed Wind

VHF Standard Horizon Intrepid with remote. SSB ICOM IC-M802 Stereo Dual MCD237BT (has Bluetooth) with both salon and cockpit speakers LCD 23 in. TV Sound bar with subwoofer Ritchie Compass in binnacle with SS cover Engine instruments & alarm at binnacle Electrical / Mechanical Electrical/ Mechanical (2) 30A, 50 ft. shore cords 30A SS shore inlet 30A isolation transformer Main electrical panel with monitoring Freedom inverter/converter with remote (2) Xantrex digital echo chargers 2 AGM house battery’s AGM Start battery AGM Windlass battery Guest house battery switch Maxwell Neilson electric anchor windlass with chain gypsy and drum Dickenson diesel fireplace (2) Shower sumps with pumps Main water pump with accumulator Hot water heater - electric and engine Kiss Wind Turbine with regulator (2) Solar Panels with regulator Emergency (hand) bilge pump Remote freezer temp gage Tank Tender system

Xantrex Link 10 battery monitor Manual bilge pump Racor fuel filtration system Fuel supply/return valves (3) Fuel Tanks - port, stbd, center XAR Digital Alternator Regulator High output alternator (externally controlled) Hynautics hydraulic steering system Remote, water and air cooled refrigeration / freezer system with cold plates Start battery switch (2 position for emergency start from house bank) PSS dripless Shaft Seal 3 bladed bronze prop with PropSpeed Black-water macerator pump Main bilge pump (Rule) - automatic Auxiliary bilge pump - automatic Remote LPG switch Newport (Dickinson) fireplace Manual (backup) galley seawater foot pump

Specs

Designers
?
Builders
?
Associations
?
# Built
?
Hull
Monohull
Keel
?
Rudder
?
Construction
?

Dimensions

Length Overall
41 11 / 12.8 m
Waterline Length
?
Beam
?
Draft
?
Displacement
?
Ballast
?

Rig and Sails

Type
?
Reported Sail Area
?
Total Sail Area
?
Mainsail
Sail Area
?
P
?
E
?
Air Draft
?
Foresail
Sail Area
?
I
?
J
?
Forestay Length
?

Auxilary Power

Make
?
Model
?
HP
?
Fuel Type
?
Fuel Capacity
?
Engine Hours
?

Accomodations

Water Capacity
?
Holding Tank Capacity
?
Headroom
?
Cabins
?

Calculations

Hull Speed
?

Hull Speed

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Formula

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

A more accurate formula devised by Dave Gerr in The Propeller Handbook replaces the Speed/Length ratio constant of 1.34 with a calculation based on the Displacement/Length ratio.

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio.311
Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

?
Classic formula: ?
Sail Area/Displacement
?

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

Formula

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64)2/3

  • SA: Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D: Displacement in pounds.
?
<16: under powered
16-20: good performance
>20: high performance
Ballast/Displacement
?

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Formula

Ballast / Displacement * 100

?
<40: less stiff, less powerful
>40: stiffer, more powerful
Displacement/Length
?

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

Formula

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet
?
<100: ultralight
100-200: light
200-300: moderate
300-400: heavy
>400: very heavy
Comfort Ratio
?

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Formula

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam1.33)

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet
?
<20: lightweight racing boat
20-30: coastal cruiser
30-40: moderate bluewater cruising boat
40-50: heavy bluewater boat
>50: extremely heavy bluewater boat
Capsize Screening
?

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

Formula

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet
  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
?
<2: better suited for ocean passages
>2: better suited for coastal cruising

This listing is presented by SailboatListings.com. Visit their website for more information or to contact the seller.

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