LeComte Yachts

19561993

Overview

Founded by Adolf “Dolf” LeComte, originally an exporter of Dutch built yachts for an expanding American Market. He soon opened his own yard in the town of Jutphaas, south of Utrecht. Contracts with the yacht design firm of John Alden Co. followed, resulting in the wood construction of 33’ Malabar Senior sloops and 42’ Nordfarer yawls, as well as finishing the Halmatic-molded 38’ Challenger yawls. In 1961, LeComte-Holland moved into fiberglass construction exclusively, starting with the Medalist 33 sloop, followed in 1962 with the North East 38 sloop/yawl. Quality construction was the norm, with solid-glass hulls, Airex-cored decks, yacht quality varnished interiors and attractive designs joined in a competitive hull and rig design. 1965 brought the flush-deck, teak-decked 52’ Ocean Racer, the last of the Tripp designs with LeComte. In addition to constantly upgrading the yachts, in 1966 a complete redesign of hulls, rigs and interiors kept these designs current and popular. In 1968, soon after opening a modern building facility in Vianen on the Lek River, (just south of Jutphaas) the Luders-designed Fastnet 45 sloop/yawl joined the LeComte family. 1970 brought the phasing out of the Medalist 33 in favor of the LeComte-designed ALC-35 sloop, and 1971 replaced the North East 38 with the ALC-40 sloop. 1973 brought the redesign of the Fastnet 45 as the ALC-46 sloop/ketch. While all this was going on, LeComte-Holland was conducting an active program of military/commercial building of fiberglass powerboats, such as 20-meter pilot boats for the Hook of Holland, landing craft for the Dutch Marines and fishing trawlers. These contracts gave the company experience in foam-cored hulls, which served as a basis for the later move into rigid hull inflatable (RHIB) boats and tunnel-hulled landing craft and utility boats. In 1963, Dolf LeComte purchased a piece of waterfront property on New Rochelle’s Lower Harbor, bulkhead, dredged and back filled, and built a 32-slip marina. In addition to moving the sales office there, Dolf developed a small staff of skilled workers to commission and service the new yachts arriving from Holland. Incorporated as Glen Island Yacht Club, the slip holders benefited by having these craftsmen on site to service their yachts, too. Retiring in 1994, Dolf LeComte closed LeComte-Holland and sold the Vianen property to a non-marine industrial user. Extracted from company website - http://www.lecomteyachts.com/profile.htm which is no longer active.


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