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2004 30Murray Peteron Gaff Rigged Cutter

Listed

Seller's Description

Description

** ORIGINAL LISTING BROKER : Artisan Boatworks Inc. of Rockport, Maine **

DESCRIPTION:

2004 30’ Peterson Gaff Rigged Cutter

Murray G. Petersons schooner designs are well known, but many consider Susan a modest 28-foot schooner that he drew for himself and his family late in life to be his greatest achievement. The boat was handsome and rugged, and offered the feel of a yacht twice its size all very appealing to Frank Mann, a Massachusetts yachtsman with a penchant for gaff rig and offshore cruising.

Mann and his wife, Katrina, had been looking for a traditional boat that, while small in size, had the sea-keeping ability of a much larger yacht. Spacious accommodations were not a concern, and complicated systems were out of the question. A modified Susan design seemed like the right choice.

Mann approached Bill Peterson, the late designers son, and negotiated rights to use the lines to build one hull. They then had Peterson, who carries on his fathers work, lengthen the yacht by 2 feet and draw the boat as a topsail cutter. A traditional schooner rig with two masts and split houses would sacrifice precious accommodation space, especially on a boat of this size.

Katy was to be built plank on frame, cedar on oak. Mann began searching for a yard that would be up to the task and suggested the project to Cape Cod boatbuilder Ned Crosby, owner of E.M. Crosby Boatworks in West Barnstable, Mass., and grandson of the legendary boatbuilder Chester A. Crosby. Ned Crosby enlisted two of his grandfathers former employees, Mike Santos and Ted Crosby, a cousin. Together they brought 90 years of boatbuilding experience to the yard.

Although the boats construction was traditional, lofting the hull was a high-tech affair. Mann had Petersons lines loaded into a CAD system, and 20 plywood panels were laser cut to produce a jig type of mold. Mann said at first Crosby was skeptical of the lofting method, but once the jig was assembled, the precision-cut and -labeled form proved to be a major time saver.

Equipment: Like Susan, Katy has a spoon bow in contrast with the clipper bow Peterson drew on many of his other designs. High bulwarks, lots of freeboard and broad teak decks enhance the yachts big-boat feel. Also, because the house has been kept small, there is room for wide side decks, making the yachts beam seem much broader than 9 feet.

Below deck, every bit of precious space has been used brilliantly. Up forward are a simple nav station, a galley and two V-berths that can be expanded to sleep four. The galley is fitted with a two-burner Force 10 stove and oven that is concealed by the counter when not in use. To port there is a fully enclosed head with additional storage space.

The joinery is bright finished teak, mahogany and cypress cedar, and the house overhead is painted off-white in the Herreshoff style. Countless traditional details abound, including deck prisms, bronze hardware from Davey & Co. in Colchester, England; wooden blocks from Dauphine; and an antique Japanese binnacle, complete with a kerosene lantern.

PROPULSION: Engine Make Yanmar Engine Model 3GM Total Power 27hp Engine Type Inboard Drive Type Direct Drive

DIMENSIONS : Length Overall 28.83ft Max Draft 4ft Beam 9ft Cabin Headroom 6ft

TANKS : Fresh Water Tank 30 X 2 Gal (GRP) Fuel Tank 1 X 32 Gal (GRP) Holding Tank

ACCOMODATIONS : Single Berths 4 Heads 1

Under current ownership since 2018, the following upgrades have been made to KATY:

-Strip and refinish all brightwork (10 coats) including spars

-New cockpit and interior cushions

-New Yanmar engine panel

-New B&G Vulcan GPS Plotter, SIMRAD RS35 VHF, and NAIS 500 AIS transponder

-Rebuilt Edson worm drive steering gear

-New mainsail, staysail, and Jib by Nat Wilson

-New custom sail covers

-Full in-water winter canvas cover with frame (see photos)

-Re-wired mast with LED tri-color, anchor light, and strobe

-New custom bronze masthead assembly and removable running back-stays

-New EPIRB

-New dining table

** I HOPE YOU ENJOYED THIS BEAUTIFUL CLASSIC **

CONTACT

Glenn Schroeder

Barnegat Bay Yacht Brokerage

609-312-8263

Heartsdesire1925@gmail.com

SEE ALL MY LISTINGS ON BOAT NATION: https://www.boatnation.com/listing/barnegat-bay-yacht-brokerage/

** THE CLASSICS ARE WHAT WE SELL **

Thank you, Glenn Schroeder

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Specs

Designers
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Builders
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Associations
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# Built
?
Hull
Monohull
Keel
?
Rudder
?
Construction
?

Dimensions

Length Overall
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Waterline Length
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Beam
8 11 / 2.7 m
Draft
4 0 / 1.2 m
Displacement
?
Ballast
?

Rig and Sails

Type
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Reported Sail Area
?
Total Sail Area
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Mainsail
Sail Area
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P
?
E
?
Air Draft
?
Foresail
Sail Area
?
I
?
J
?
Forestay Length
?

Auxilary Power

Make
?
Model
?
HP
?
Fuel Type
?
Fuel Capacity
?
Engine Hours
?

Accomodations

Water Capacity
?
Holding Tank Capacity
?
Headroom
?
Cabins
2

Calculations

Hull Speed
?

Hull Speed

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Formula

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

A more accurate formula devised by Dave Gerr in The Propeller Handbook replaces the Speed/Length ratio constant of 1.34 with a calculation based on the Displacement/Length ratio.

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio.311
Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

?
Classic formula: ?
Sail Area/Displacement
?

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

Formula

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64)2/3

  • SA: Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D: Displacement in pounds.
?
<16: under powered
16-20: good performance
>20: high performance
Ballast/Displacement
?

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Formula

Ballast / Displacement * 100

?
<40: less stiff, less powerful
>40: stiffer, more powerful
Displacement/Length
?

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

Formula

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet
?
<100: ultralight
100-200: light
200-300: moderate
300-400: heavy
>400: very heavy
Comfort Ratio
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Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Formula

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam1.33)

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet
?
<20: lightweight racing boat
20-30: coastal cruiser
30-40: moderate bluewater cruising boat
40-50: heavy bluewater boat
>50: extremely heavy bluewater boat
Capsize Screening
?

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

Formula

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet
  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
?
<2: better suited for ocean passages
>2: better suited for coastal cruising

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